Under a new policy that the American Academy of Pediatrics announced on Tuesday, June 24, doctors will tell parents to read aloud to their infants from birth. With the increased recognition that an important part of brain development occurs within the first three years of a child’s life, and that reading to children enhances vocabulary and other important communication skills, the group, which represents 62,000 pediatricians across the country, is asking its members to become powerful advocates for reading aloud, every time a baby visits the doctor.

“It should be there each time we touch bases with children,” said Dr. Pamela High, who wrote the new policy. It recommends that doctors tell parents they should be “reading together as a daily fun family activity” from infancy. This is the first time the academy has officially weighed in on early literacy education.

“The reality of today’s world is that we’re competing with portable digital media,” said Dr. Alanna Levine, a pediatrician in Orangeburg, N.Y. “So you really want to arm parents with the tools and rationale behind it about why it’s important to stick to the basics of things like books.”